Diabetic Foot Care and Ulcers Treatment

feetDiabetic patients often suffer from continued foot problems, including heel fissures and diabetic ulcers. Over time, a diabetic patient’s circulation becomes compromised due to the hardening and narrowing of the blood vessels in the feet and legs.

Poor circulation in combination with high-pressure areas on the bottom of the foot can lead to callous formation. If not properly treated, the callous can lead to an ulcer. Currently it is estimated that within the United States nearly 20% of diabetic ulcers will result in amputation. These ulcers can be difficult to heal due to inadequate blood flow and increased risk of infection.*

Prevention is the best medicine when it comes to diabetic foot care. Heel fissures, are caused by recurrent callous formation and can be treated with a compounded topical medication that aims to moisturize the area and promote healing. A cream that has often been prescribed contains clobetasol, terbinafine, econazole and urea and is applied to the heels every night for 2 weeks, then pm to help prevent these fissures from becoming ulcers. Proper hygiene as well as good nutrition is also essential in promoting healing.

Wound care is one of the foremost concerns of patients with diabetes. Primary problems that make diabetic ulcers difficult to heal include inadequate blood flow to the wounded areas and increased risk of infection. Thus, treatment of wounds in the diabetic patient must address rapid granulation, increased circulation, and prevention of infection. All of these concerns can be addressed with the use of customized topical medications.

* International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding Vol 8 No 4